energy and innovation

Carbon capture and storage (CCS)

ExxonMobil is the leader in carbon capture, with current carbon capture capacity totaling about 9 million tonnes per year.

On Feb. 1, 2021, ExxonMobil announced the creation of a new business  – ExxonMobil Low Carbon Solutions – to commercialize and deploy emission-reduction technologies. It will initially focus on carbon capture and storage, one of the critical technologies required to achieve net zero emissions and the climate goals outlined in the Paris Agreement.

CCS Development

Reducing emissions with carbon capture

CCS is the process of capturing CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere from industrial activity, and injecting it into deep geologic formations for safe, secure and permanent storage. The United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the International Energy Agency agree that CCS is one of the most important low-carbon technologies required to achieve societal climate goals at the lowest cost. CCS is also one of the only technologies that could enable some industry sectors to decarbonize, including the refining, chemicals, cement and steel sectors.

ExxonMobil has more than 30 years of experience in CCS technology and was the first company to capture more than 120 million tonnes of CO2, which is equivalent to the emissions of more than 25 million cars for one year. The company has an equity share in about one-fifth of global CO2 capture capacity and has captured approximately 40 percent of all the captured anthropogenic CO2 in the world.

ExxonMobil’s newly announced Low Carbon Solutions business is advancing plans for more than 20 new carbon capture and storage opportunities around the world to enable large-scale emission reductions.

Infographic: A quick look at ExxonMobil’s CCS leadership
With our demonstrated leadership in carbon capture and emissions reduction technologies, ExxonMobil is committed to meeting the demand for affordable energy while reducing emissions and managing the risks of climate change.
Darren W. Woods

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Low carbon solutions

ExxonMobil is calling for a CCS concept that could effectively decarbonize industrial areas like the Houston Ship Channel. 

Read more about this concept.

120M+

ExxonMobil was the first company to capture more than 120 million tonnes of CO2, equivalent to the annual emissions of more than 25 million cars.

All articles about carbon capture and storage

Why ExxonMobil supports carbon pricing The recent steps by the American Petroleum Institute (API) to support a carbon price will contribute to advancing a lower-carbon future. For some time, we have been encouraging trade associations to support a price on carbon and promote actions that enable the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Carbon capture Energy Factor March 30, 2021

ExxonMobil Low Carbon Solutions to commercialize emission-reduction technology

IRVING, Texas – ExxonMobil said today it has created a new business to commercialize its extensive low-carbon technology portfolio. The new business, ExxonMobil Low Carbon Solutions, will initially focus on carbon capture and storage, one of the critical technologies required to achieve net zero emissions and the climate goals outlined in the Paris Agreement.

Newsroom News Feb. 1, 2021

ExxonMobil expands agreement with Global Thermostat, sees promise in direct air capture technology IRVING, Texas – ExxonMobil and Global Thermostat have expanded their joint development agreement following 12 months of technical evaluation to determine the feasibility and potential scalability of Global Thermostat’s technology that captures carbon dioxide (CO2) directly from the air.   

Newsroom News Sept. 21, 2020

Scrub and remove: Capturing carbon straight out of the air Global Thermostat and ExxonMobil are extending their collaboration to continue researching pathways to scale the removal of CO2 emissions from the atmosphere.

Carbon capture Energy Factor Sept. 21, 2020

Carbon capture research travels the world ExxonMobil is working with a leading expert in Genoa, Italy, to research how fuel cells could be used to efficiently capture carbon emissions.

Carbon capture Energy Factor Sept. 1, 2020