Anne Guinard, Safety and Environment Supervisor

ExxonMobil’s LaBarge facility in Wyoming currently captures more carbon dioxide emissions than any industrial facility in the world. The technology being deployed here can be scaled around the world to help society reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In this series, we will meet some of the LaBarge team and learn about the roles they’re playing in the energy transition to a lower-emission future.

Keeping people safe is Anne Guinard’s number-one priority. As the security, safety, health and environment supervisor at LaBarge, she’s focused on getting hundreds of employees home safely each day, and she plays a critical role in keeping the facility running smoothly.

Anne began her career as a safety adviser at ExxonMobil’s Canadian affiliate, Imperial Oil, before transferring to Houston. But it was LaBarge’s status as a center of carbon capture that drew her to Wyoming. She says she’s fascinated by the technology’s potential to reduce emissions, as well as LaBarge’s ability to serve as an example for future carbon capture sites around the globe. LaBarge’s future is also poised for growth, with an estimated $400 million expansion into carbon capture and storage planned to start up in 2025 – an ambitious undertaking that excites Anne.

Anne spoke with Energy Factor about her job and about how the facility’s operations can help chart a course for the rest of the world.

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In southeast Texas, in a clearing surrounded by farmland, there’s a rig drilling a well for ExxonMobil. Nothing out of the ordinary in an area accustomed to oil and gas operations. But this well is anything but ordinary. And it isn’t for oil or gas operations.