Research and innovation

University and National Labs partnerships

We collaborate with leading universities and institutions around the world as part of our commitment to finding meaningful and scalable solutions to meet global energy demand, while also minimizing the environmental impacts of energy use, including the risks of climate change.

COOPERATION AND COLLABORATION

Fueling future energy discoveries

ExxonMobil continually looks for ways in which science and technology can help drive innovation in the work we do. Every day, we engage with diverse academic institutions to research and develop new solutions to help us meet society’s dual challenge: meeting energy needs while also minimizing the environmental impacts of energy use, including the risks of climate change.

Our work focuses on the research of breakthrough lower-emissions technologies, including advances in materials science and carbon capture and storage. These collaborative relationships with many of the world’s most advanced research colleges and universities can fuel new discoveries and empower advanced energy research.

Research and development highlights

>80

universities around the world which Exxon has partnered with, including MIT, University of Texas, Stanford, Princeton, National University of Singapore, and National Technical University of Singapore.

20K

scientists and engineers employed by ExxonMobil, including more than 2,200 with Ph.Ds
The old mindset of ‘my lab is my world,’ has changed to ‘the world is my lab,’ which is why we have created a network of collaborators across disciplines to join us.
Nazeer Bhore manager of breakthrough research
Nazeer Bhore

Manager, breakthrough research at ExxonMobil

NATIONAL LABS COLLABORATION

Developing breakthrough solutions

In addition to partnering with over 80 universities, ExxonMobil in 2019 proudly launched collaborative programs with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Together, we are working to develop scalable energy solutions and greenhouse gas mitigation technologies that make a global impact. The joint research will also investigate ways to reduce emissions from fuels and petrochemicals production. Learn more about this partnership

$100M

investment over 10 years with U.S. Department of Energy’s National Labs.
Energy Factor

Plant Power

Work is underway to study the conversion of cellulosic biomass into diesel and jet fuel. Breakthroughs require scientific research collaborations, much like the one inked by the University of Wisconsin and ExxonMobil, to provide the fundamental knowledge required to move the science forward.
Learn more

All articles about university partnerships

Across the world, building our energy future Rooted in science, innovation at ExxonMobil is sparked by thousands of engineers and scientists – including 2,500 PhDs – working to scale promising ideas into viable, industrial-grade products. That dedication influences the entire business, from catalysts that help make refineries more energy efficient to longer-term research that scales up low-emission technologies.

Research partners Energy Factor Sept. 11, 2020

Carbon capture research travels the world ExxonMobil is working with a leading expert in Genoa, Italy, to research how fuel cells could be used to efficiently capture carbon emissions.

Carbon capture Energy Factor Sept. 1, 2020

Planting the seed for renewable diesel ExxonMobil recently announced an agreement with alternative fuels developer Global Clean Energy to purchase renewable diesel. The engine-ready fuel will be partially derived from camelina, a plant that does not displace food crops and could have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on the road– a win-win.

Carbon capture Energy Factor Aug. 11, 2020

ExxonMobil, Georgia Tech and Imperial College London publish joint research on potential breakthrough in membrane technology IRVING, Texas – Scientists from ExxonMobil, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Imperial College of London have published joint research on potential breakthroughs in a new membrane technology that could reduce emissions and energy intensity associated with refining crude oil. Laboratory tests indicate the patent-pending membrane could be used to replace some heat-intensive distillation at refineries in the years ahead.

Newsroom News July 17, 2020

Working together on tomorrow's energy ExxonMobil and researchers from Georgia Tech and Imperial College London are working together on membrane technology research that could reduce carbon dioxide emissions and lower the energy required during the process of refining crude oil.

Energy efficiency Energy Factor July 17, 2020