Skip to main content
Search
Group of students examining leaves outdoors

National Math and Science Initiative

ExxonMobil became a founding sponsor of the National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) in 2007 with a $125 million commitment to the non-profit organization, which provides scalable and rigorous program solutions that empower school communities to prepare all students to succeed in college and the workforce.

To better prepare students and teachers for the world of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), NMSI replicates proven programs with quantifiable results – such as its College Readiness Program, Laying the Foundation and UTeach™ – on a national scale.

Through its College Readiness Program, NMSI is creating change in schools across the country, dramatically increasing the number of students taking and earning qualifying scores on Advanced Placement® (AP®) math, science and English exams and expanding access to rigorous coursework to traditionally underrepresented students participating in the College Readiness programs. By fostering increased access to this rigorous, college-­level coursework for all students, NMSI is also helping to close achievement gaps for minority and female students.

A critical component in raising the bar on math and science education is providing high­-quality professional development for in-service teachers, as well recruiting and preparing a new corps of motivated and gifted math and science teachers. Through its programs, NMSI has trained more than 50,000 teachers across the country.

NMSI's hallmark teacher preparation program at the university level, UTeach, is working to build the quality of our future teacher corps. This program ensures that new teachers have both a deep knowledge of math and science as well as the expertise on how to teach these subjects effectively. UTeach is implemented in 44 universities in 21 states and the District of Columbia, and expects to produce 8,000 graduates by 2020, positively impacting more than five million math and science students. The goal is to expand this program to 50 campuses in the next decade.

Close